me

me
pronoun, objective case of i Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mē; akin to Old High German mīh me, Latin me, Greek me, Sanskrit Usage: Me is used in many constructions where strict grammarians prescribe I. This usage is not so much ungrammatical as indicative of the shrinking range of the nominative form: me began to replace I sometime around the 16th century largely because of the pressure of word order. I is now chiefly used as the subject of an immediately following verb. Me occurs in every other position: absolutely <
who, me?
>
, emphatically <
me too
>
, and after prepositions, conjunctions, and verbs, including be <
come with me
>
<
you're as big as me
>
<
it's me
>
. Almost all usage books recognize the legitimacy of me in these positions, especially in speech; some recommend I in formal and especially written contexts after be and after as and than when the first term of the comparison is the subject of a verb.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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